Thoughts & Sayings (October 2012)


Here are some thoughts and sayings I posted on Twitter and/or Facebook in September. To my knowledge, I made these up (for better or for worse). Sit back, relax, and enjoy the write!

peddlingEncouraging Words

1. Keep on peddling, but don’t oversell.

2. I may bite my tongue if I say something tongue in cheek.

3. I have champagne tastes but a beer budget and had to trade my flute for a mug.

4. If technology were a pet, I would send it to obedience training.

5. After two failed attempts, I’m back to fail again.

junkTwisted Words

6. One person’s junk is another’s Chinese vessel.

In Its Own Write

7. I’ve turned a page and am headed in the write direction.

Holidays & Events

8. On Labor Day, America rests while the rest of the world labors.

9. Today at the political party convention, the candidate will deliver this month’s speech of their life.

barkRandom Musings

10. Overheard at a linguistic convention: “I speak Danish, Norwegian, and Swedish.” “Yes, but what about Finnish?”

11. I flew to the other side of the world to get away from jetlag, but it followed me.

12. My bark is worse than my bite, but I do bite.

13. Disruptive technology: The day Twitter shakes up the 140-character limit by varying it.

14. When I moved to the Southern Hemisphere, my world turned upside down.

globe

Click here to read the previous batch of Thoughts and Sayings.

Images courtesy of Microsoft.

alexthumbM.G. Edwards is a writer of books and stories in the mystery, thriller and science fiction-fantasy genres. He also writes travel adventures. He is author of Kilimanjaro: One Man’s Quest to Go Over the Hill, a non-fiction account of his attempt to summit Mount Kilimanjaro, Africa’s highest mountain, a collection of short stories called Real Dreams: Thirty Years of Short Stories and Alexander the Salamander, a children’s story set in the Amazon. His books are available to purchase as an e-book and in print from Amazon.com and other booksellers. He lives in Bangkok, Thailand with his wife Jing and son Alex.

For more books or stories by M.G. Edwards, visit his web site at www.mgedwards.com or his blog, World Adventurers. Contact him at me@mgedwards.com, on Facebook, on Google+, or @m_g_edwards on Twitter.

© 2012 Brilliance Press. All rights reserved. No part of this work may be reproduced or transmitted without the written consent of the author.

Exploring Bang Phlap, Thailand by Bicycle


I enjoy riding bicycle in rural Thailand. I occasionally ride with a great group of people who leave the close confines of suburban Bangkok and cycle to the rural areas of greater Bangkok. Some of the better places to ride are on the western bank of the Chao Phraya River that cuts the city of Bangkok in two. Bang Phlap District in northern Bangkok is one such place.

2012_02_11 Bicycle Ride (10)

2012_02_11 Bicycle Ride (9)

2012_02_11 Bicycle Ride (14)

Once you cross the river by ferry, you are free to explore a beautiful part of the city. Weaving through the narrow streets and alleys while avoiding traffic and aggressive soi (street) dogs is an adventure.

2012_02_11 Bicycle Ride (4)

2012_02_11 Bicycle Ride (3)

The back streets of Bang Phlap offer a feast for the eyes as it skirts Koh Kred Island along the Chao Phraya waterfront. Some alleys no wider than walkways pass just above canals and swamps. It takes some skill to stay on your bicycle as you dodge dogs, mopeds and speed bumps without falling into the murky water. The scenic photo opportunities reward you for your effort.

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2012_02_11 Bicycle Ride (5)

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As you ride, you may pass some beautiful Buddhist temples along the way. The most memorable one is Wat Bangchak, home to a giant gold Buddha sitting cross-legged facing the Chao Phraya River. The beautiful Buddha meditates serenely at the river’s edge. At least five other temples are located around Bang Phlap.

2012_02_11 Bicycle Ride (22)

2012_02_11 Bicycle Ride (20)

A bicycle ride in Bang Phlap takes you through neighborhoods where homes sit on stilts above the water line, small businesses are painted in bright, cheery colors, and children chant their lessons at school so loudly that their voices echo in the street. It’s a lot of fun to explore this beautiful and interesting part of Thailand by bicycle.

Bang Phlap District, Bangkok, Thailand. February 2012.

 

Map picture

The Road to Wisdom (part two)


The cold seeped into my bones. The heat my body generated while I rode kept me warm; that is, until I reached a straightaway and was hit with a crisp headwind that left me shivering. My derrière was about the only part of my body still dry, and it ached from saddle sores. I could hardly peddle and labored mightily to continue. The road ahead disappeared into a wall of mist. I was numb but kept pedaling, driven by the urge to find Wisdom. I pedaled and pedaled. My eyes wandered to the river meandering next to the highway, one of the few points of interest not shrouded in fog that offered an escape from my predicament.

Wisdom

I rode on alone. Not a single car drove by. Only the sound of the babbling river and rain pelting on my saturated windbreaker filled my ears. The rain never stopped, at times pouring down on me in sheets before dissipating into a lighter downpour, then growing heavy again. Water filled my glasses, and I had to clear them with my finger like a makeshift windshield wiper in order to see the road. Water filled my ears, and my finger doubled as a swab.

After a couple more hours, I could no longer ignore fatigue. I chided myself for getting separated from my group. Perseverance, or perhaps stubbornness, had brought me to this point, stranded in the middle of nowhere. My mind resolved to continue even after my body begged to stop. Wisdom couldn’t be that far, I reasoned. I am almost there. The town had to be after the next few bends; surely I would be there soon. My body rebelled, but my mind won the argument.

I spotted a green highway mileage sign with neon white letters in the distance. I pushed myself as fast as I could go, sprinting to the sign. If it proved me right, I could ride the last few miles to town and then wait for the others to arrive.

“Wisdom – 14 Miles,” the sign taunted me. It crushed my spirit. The distance was almost five times farther than I thought! I gave up and stopped then and there, refusing to go on. I would wait in the rain for someone to find me. I prayed someone would rescue me soon. Heavy rain continued.

At that moment I heard the sound of a car horn. It was the sag wagon! The blue Ford van pulling a large trailer stopped on the shoulder next to me. The driver rolled down his window and yelled to me through the rain, “Hey, why don’t you load up your bike? We’ll take you to Wisdom.”

I couldn’t believe it! I was saved. The driver loaded up my bicycle, and I hopped into the warm cab, relieved that my ordeal had come to an end. We drove to town and spent the night. The next day, the rain let up, and we spent two more sunny days finishing the ride to Missoula.

Wisdom (3)

The experience taught me a valuable lesson. I realized that when you find yourself in a difficult situation, and you’re ready to give up, draw strength from God. He often saves you from yourself. The road to Wisdom is best taken if you don’t try to do it on your own.

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