Argentina


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From the Atlantic Ocean to the top of the Andes Mountains, Argentina is a bridge between the Old and New Worlds. Innately European but distinctly Latin American, the country is a melding of cultural influences brought by the Spaniards and western immigrants and a unique geographic backdrop that offers some of earth’s most stunning scenes. Renown Argentine writer Ernesto Sabato described his homeland thus: “Because of our European roots, we deeply link the nation with the enduring values of the Old World; because of our condition of Americans we link ourselves to the rest of the continent.” One cannot sit drinking a glass of Mendoza wine in the foothills of the Andes or enjoying parrilla (grill) in the shadow of the cruise ships bound for Antarctica departing from Tierra del Fuego without thinking of Europe and the Americas. Argentines are rightly proud of their country and culture that invite visitors to indulge in and savor.

More About Argentina

Casa Rosada in Buenos Aires

2008_05_15 Argentina Buenos Aires IMG_3557

Penguin and Seal Colony in the Beagle Channel, Tierra del Fuego

2009_01_25 Argentina Beagle Channel IMG_5229

Llao Llao Resort and Nahuel Huapi Lake near San Carlos de Bariloche

2009_02_03 Argentina Bariloche Llao Llao Resort IMG_6372

Perito Moreno Glacier in Los Glacieres National Park

2009_02_09 Argentina Perito Moreno IMG_6210

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Perito Moreno Glacier, Argentina (Video)


Click here to read the original article on MG Edwards. Visit MG Edwards for more great travelogues, photos, and video from around the world.

Perito Moreno Glacier in Los Glacieres National Park, Argentina is one of the most stunning ice flows in the world. It is one of 48 glaciers fed by the Southern Patagonian Ice Field covering a large portion of the Andes Mountains between Argentina and Chile in South America. Located in the Patagonia region and Santa Cruz Province near the Chilean border, Perito Moreno is popular with tourists because of its incredible, in-your-face ice falls and ruptures that happen just a few hundred meters away, yet oh-so-close. It’s one of the few road-and wheelchair- accessible glaciers, making it easy for tourists to visit on a day trip from the nearby town of El Calafate. Because of its sheer size and pristine white and blue ice fed by one of the world’s few growing ice fields, the massive flow offers sweeping panoramic views unlike any other glacier on earth.

2009_02_09 Argentina Perito Moreno IMG_6210 (small)

This video clip taken in 2009 features stunning footage of Perito Moreno and pieces of ice calving, or breaking off, from the glacier in spectacular fashion. There are also voice overs and a scene with my young son that you might enjoy. The warm, sunny day was ideal to view the glacier and watch the ice calving unfold.

Perito Moreno Glacier, Argentina

 

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Click here to read the original article on MG Edwards. Visit MG Edwards for more great travelogues, photos, and video from around the world.

Iguazu Falls vs. Victoria Falls (with Photos)


This updates an article I posted in 2010, with photos showing different views of mighty Iguazu Falls and Victoria Falls. Click here to read the original article.

I’ve had the rare opportunity to visit two of the world’s great waterfalls, Iguazu (Iguaçu) Falls on the Argentina-Brazil border in South America and Victoria Falls (Mosi-Oa-Tunya) on the Zambia-Zimbabwe border in Africa. Each was just a few hours’ drive from my former homes in Asunción, Paraguay and Lusaka, Zambia, respectively, and I visited them often. As measured by water volume, both are the two largest and arguably most spectacular waterfalls in the world.

It’s easy to conclude when you visit one that it’s more impressive than the other. Some claim that Iguazu Falls is better while others prefer Victoria Falls. Iguazu Falls is one of the New Seven Wonders of Nature and is the wider of the two with cascades that look like bridal veils. Victoria Falls, a World Heritage Site, is higher with a massive curtain of water during the rainy season that disappears in the dry season. Iguazu has the “Devil’s Throat,” a narrow falls where the water crashes into a torrential pool, and Victoria the “Devil’s Pool,” a whirlpool at the edge of the falls where visitors can swim during the dry season. One is in Africa and the other in South America, lending geographical biases in favor of one or the other.

What do you think? Here are photos of each waterfall at different times of the year. Decide for yourself. After browsing through the photos, vote for your favorite waterfall at the bottom of this post.

Iguazu Falls / Iguaçu Falls – Argentina-Brazil

2008_01_19 Brazil Iguazu (1)

2008_01_19 Brazil Iguazu (3)

2008_01_19 Brazil Iguazu (4)

2008_01_19 Brazil Iguazu (5)

2008_01_19 Brazil Iguazu (6)

2008_01_19 Brazil Iguazu (7)

2008_01_19 Brazil Iguazu (8)

2008_01_19 Brazil Iguazu (9)

2008_01_19 Brazil Iguazu (10)

2008_01_19 Brazil Iguazu (12)

2008_01_19 Brazil Iguazu (11)

2008_01_19 Brazil Iguazu (13)

2008_01_19 Brazil Iguazu (14)

2008_01_19 Brazil Iguazu

Victoria Falls / Mosi-Oa-Tunya – Zambia-Zimbabwe

2010_11_05 Zambia Victoria Falls (1)

2010_11_05 Zambia Victoria Falls (4)

2010_11_05 Zambia Victoria Falls (6)

2010_11_05 Zambia Victoria Falls (11)

Vote for your favorite now and post your comments below!

This poll is unscientific and has a margin of error of +/- 100%.

Which waterfall do I think is more impressive? Click here to find out.

2010_11_05 Zambia Victoria Falls

buythumbM.G. Edwards is a writer of books and stories in the mystery, thriller and science fiction-fantasy genres. He also writes travel adventures. He is author of Kilimanjaro: One Man’s Quest to Go Over the Hill, a non-fiction account of his attempt to summit Mount Kilimanjaro, Africa’s highest mountain, a collection of short stories called Real Dreams: Thirty Years of Short Stories and Alexander the Salamander, a children’s story set in the Amazon. His books are available to purchase as an e-book and in print from Amazon.com and other booksellers. He lives in Bangkok, Thailand with his wife Jing and son Alex.

For more books or stories by M.G. Edwards, visit his web site at www.mgedwards.com or his blog, World Adventurers. Contact him at me@mgedwards.com, on Facebook, on Google+, or @m_g_edwards on Twitter.

© 2012 Brilliance Press. All rights reserved. No part of this work may be reproduced or transmitted without the written consent of the author.

Victoria Falls and Iguaçu Falls


Click here to read a follow-on article about Victoria Falls and Iguaçu Falls with photos.

I’ve had the rare opportunity over the past year to visit two of the world’s largest waterfalls.  I visited Iguaçu Falls on the Argentine-Brazilian border in February 2009 prior to leaving South America, where I had lived for two years.  I just returned from a short weekend trip to Victoria Falls on the Zambian-Zimbabwean border, which is a six-hour trip from Lusaka, Zambia by car.  As measured by water volume, these two waterfalls are two of the largest and arguably most spectacular waterfalls in the world.

It’s easy to make comparisons between the two.  In truth, both waterfalls are equally impressive.  They’re different, so it’s difficult to say whether one is “better” than the other.  Iguaçu Falls is larger by volume and longer.  It comprises numerous waterfalls that give it a layered effect, and it stretches over a longer distance than Victoria Falls.  The Parana River above Iguaçu Falls collects at the top of the falls and cascades down over what must be a stretch of five miles or longer.  At the same time, Iguaçu features a boardwalk on the Brazil side that puts you near the heart of the waterfall, the “Devil’s Throat” (La Garganta del Diablo).

Victoria Falls appears visually larger than its Latino counterpart.  The sheer “in your face” effect it offers you while the Zambezi River spills over is incredible.  The pathway on the Zambian side puts you very close to a massive wall of water that drops at least a couple hundred feet in front of you.  Although I wore rain gear, I was soaking wet when I passed close to the falls – wetter than I was at Iguaçu.

Although I left Iguaçu Falls convinced that it is unsurpassed in its grandeur, Victoria Falls rivals it in intensely.  Of course, visitors to either locale would undoubtedly insist that each waterfall is more impressive than the other.  As an objective outsider, I believe that these two falls collectively rank as two of the more beautiful and awe inspiring natural wonders of the world.  If you ever have a chance to visit either one, don’t miss out.  You won’t be sorry spending the money and time to behold two of God’s greatest creations.  In this respect, I feel blessed to have experienced both.